• Striking pulp mill workers gunned down by local farmers in northern ontario
    on January 1, 1970 at 12:00 am

    On February 10, 1963, one of the bloodiest labour conflicts in Canadian history took place when armed local farmers clashed with striking workers in the small community of Reesor Siding – a tragic case of working people being turned upon each other, spurred on by corporate greed. A month earlier, on January 14, the 1,500 members of Local 2995 of the Lumber and Sawmill Workers Union (part of the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America), walked out on strike. Their employer, Spruce Falls Power and Paper Company, was trying to break the pattern bargaining that had taken place for years in... The post Striking pulp mill workers gunned down by local farmers in northern ontario appeared first on Canadian Labour Congress. […]

  • Songs of solidarity and social justice
    on January 1, 1970 at 12:00 am

    One of Canada’s earliest folk music festivals was held on August 18, 1961 at Oval Park in Orillia, Ontario. The struggles of working people for fairness and social justice have been, and are still the focus of many folk singers. So many songs are linked to the history of unions and the lives of workers – a part of labour history worth exploring. Summer in Canada is the time of music festivals and one of the earliest held was Mariposa at Oval Park in Orillia. So what does this have to do with the labour movement you ask? Well –... The post Songs of solidarity and social justice appeared first on Canadian Labour Congress. […]

  • Striking workers shot and killed while marching with their families
    on January 1, 1970 at 12:00 am

    On September 29, 1931, coal miners from nearby Bienfait gathered with their families, along with several hundred other miners and their families, to parade through the streets of Estevan in order to draw attention to their strike. The RCMP confronted them, attempting to block and break up the procession, then opened fire on the crowd. Three miners were killed and many others were injured and arrested. The Black Tuesday Riot is remembered to this day as a pivotal moment in Saskatchewan’s labour history. In 1931 the miners of Bienfait Saskatchewan faced down company, government and police when they went on... The post Striking workers shot and killed while marching with their families appeared first on Canadian Labour Congress. […]

  • BC’S operation solidarity
    on January 1, 1970 at 12:00 am

    In 1983, labour and activist organizations alike across the province, including unions, environmental, religious, social justice and women’s rights groups, came together over the course of several weeks through escalating actions in what would effectively become the largest political protest in BC’s history. (Source: BC Labour Heritage Centre) In the spring of 1983, British Columbians re-elected the Social Credit Party, headed by William (Bill) Bennett. Within months of taking office, the “Socreds” introduced an austerity budget along with 26 pieces of radically right-wing legislation that included measures to abolish watchdog agencies, attack collective bargaining rights (especially in the public sector), and cut social services.... The post BC’S operation solidarity appeared first on Canadian Labour Congress. […]

  • Model language
    on January 1, 1970 at 12:00 am

    These model clauses are suggested language that unions can use to develop proposals on domestic violence for collective bargaining. Using the Principles and language adapted from precedents in Canada and Australia, this language can serve as a starting point. This resource will continue to link to new clauses as they are negotiated by Canadian unions.  The post Model language appeared first on Canadian Labour Congress. […]

  • CLC report: Corporate Tax Freedom Day is January 30 – Big businesses hoard cash from tax giveaways, not investing in jobs
    on January 1, 1970 at 12:00 am

    OTTAWA – A research study by the Canadian Labour Congress shows that CEOs in Canada could be dancing in their suites to celebrate Corporate Tax Freedom Day on January 30. Their companies will by then have paid their share of taxes to all levels of government for the entire year. “Corporate income taxes amounted to only 8.3% of all government revenues in 2011, down from 8.8% in 2010 and from an average of 11% in the 1960s and 70s,” says CLC Secretary-Treasurer Hassan Yussuff. “In return for tax breaks companies are supposed to be investing their windfall to create good... The post CLC report: Corporate Tax Freedom Day is January 30 – Big businesses hoard cash from tax giveaways, not investing in jobs appeared first on Canadian Labour Congress. […]

  • TWILH – The BC Solidarity Coalition
    on January 1, 1970 at 12:00 am

    The BC government imposes "restraint" – and the people build Solidarity [[{“fid”:”866″,”view_mode”:”default”,”fields”:{“format”:”default”,”field_file_image_alt_text[und][0][value]”:”People protesting the BC government in 1983″,”field_file_image_title_text[und][0][value]”:”People from hundreds of unions and groups challenged the BC government in 1983″},”type”:”media”,”link_text”:null,”attributes”:{“alt”:”People protesting the BC government in 1983″,”title”:”People from hundreds of unions and groups challenged the BC government in 1983″,”style”:”font-size: 13.008px; font-weight: normal; line-height: 1.538em; width: 400px; height: 267px; margin: 2px 4px;”,”class”:”media-element file-default”}}]] Image from IAMAW.ca In the spring of 1983 British Columbians elected the Social Credit Party, headed by William Bennett. Within months of taking office the “Socreds” introduced 26 pieces of radical right-wing legislation that abolished watchdog-agencies, attacked the role of collective... The post TWILH – The BC Solidarity Coalition appeared first on Canadian Labour Congress. […]